Sunday, March 14, 2010

So how are the grasshoppers now?

In the areas that were sprayed they are in much  lower numbers than they were last week. I'd say it has reduced them to less than one twentieth of the numbers last week. I can only assume that it has worked and worked well. I even planted the tomatoes under fine netting, such was my confidence.

So no more spraying this week.
A flurry of planting was in order in the home garden.
First we needed to attack  a patch of couch grass that had been getting and bigger over the summer - thanks to my dearest for that one

Planted seedlings of Broccoli, paak choi, Gossip cabbage and seeds of Fennel , Coriander, Diakon radish.
All of these seeds have been saved from plants from previous seasons.
I cleared out one clump of snake beans as they have slowed down dramatically since the weather has been below 30 degrees, and the beans have taken on a bit of a purple tinge.

A big harvest of Pumpkins today - about 30. A mixture of Jap, Butternut squash, and one called Red Curi.
There are also some Ironbark pumpkin but they need to stay on the vine until the plant dies back to improve their keeping qualities.
Other things are progressing along well.
The maize is 10 feet tall

The cape gooseberries have decied to flower but  i read that they may take 60 or more days
to form edible fruits.
The pigeon pea is growin tall but no sign of flowering.

The New Guinea bean did not thrive here ovet the summer and i suspect it is not nematode resistent. This is in contrast to a bottle gourd that i grew which was absolutely rampant.

10 comments:

  1. Wow, what a wonderful row of pumkins! How do they store? Do they need to be kept cool and out of light? How long will they hany out for uneaten? And can you bring yourself to eat them when they look SO good on your cupboards! Cheerio from Katja (who has soooo many bloomin HUGE grasshoppers that it's risky letting the kids into garden for fear they will become lunch!)

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  2. the row of pumpkins is only going to get bigger! and more diverse as the autumn goes on. the Japs will not keep long term so we'll eat them first but we expect the others to be good long keepers. I think cool is good for storing - i'd go with that feeling.
    my kids say they want to eat a grasshopper - survival instincts i'm sure.

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  3. I keep losing my comments on your blog for some reason....

    I said, your garden looks fantastic, despite the &^$&))_^@! grasshoppers.

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  4. 若對自己誠實,日積月累,就無法對別人不忠了。........................................

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  5. Hi Nelly - the comments seem to have stuck this time. Yes the home garden is relatively unscathed but the garden plot out in the rural area is getting the flogging. Still we have gone ahead and planted under netting hoping that the weather cools off soon and the hoppers disappear.

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  6. Hi Chris, I came over on Nelly's blog, hope you don't mind. I am very interested in the Maize, and would like to buy some pits if possible. We had white maize in South Africa, nothing like it. Would you have any spare?

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  7. Hi Rina, i'll check out what i have ended up with after i get home, but we should be able to get you some. To save seed from corn or maize you need to save a lot of cobs to maintain diversity. i plan to grow a larger crop next spring.

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  8. good~ keep sharing with us, please....I will waiting your up date everyday!! Have a nice day........................................

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